by ROBERTA SMITH
via NYTimes

A copper-engraved frontispiece showing Ferrante Imperato’s Wunderkammer is part of the “Rooms of Wonder” show.

A copper-engraved frontispiece showing Ferrante Imperato’s Wunderkammer is part of the “Rooms of Wonder” show.

Many exhibitions convey the propulsive force of human curiosity, but few manage to do so as engrossingly and with as much immediacy as“Rooms of Wonder: From Wunderkammer to Museum, 1599-1899,” a lavish repast of illustrated rare books and ephemera at the Grolier Club. The appetite for knowledge about foreign lands, unfamiliar animals and all the workings of the world — both natural and man-made — permeates this show, which delves into the origins of the modern museum.
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via artobserved

Jake and Dinos Chapman, The End of Fun (2010), via White Cube Gallery

Jake and Dinos Chapman, The End of Fun (2010), via White Cube Gallery

Since their graduation from the Royal College of Art in 1990, brothers Jake and Dinos Chapman have continually pushed the envelope with their iconoclastic, ambitious sculptures.  Frequently incorporating what they call “bankrupt” imagery, so frequently used by contemporary that it has lost much of its original meaning, the artists create large-scale sculptural works that have frequently drawn fierce reactions from critics and gallery visitors.
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by Josefine Wikström
via Afterall

Boris Charmatz, Flip Book, 2008/2012, performance first presented in 2008 at LiFE, Saint Nazaire, France. View of the performance at The Tanks, Tate Modern, London, September 2012. Photograph: Tate Photography. Courtesy the artist and Tate, London

Boris Charmatz, Flip Book, 2008/2012, performance first presented in 2008 at LiFE, Saint Nazaire, France. View of the performance at The Tanks, Tate Modern, London, September 2012. Photograph: Tate Photography. Courtesy the artist and Tate, London

According to Peter Osborne, art before 1945 was based on ‘a craft-based ontology of mediums’,1 mainly dominated by categories such as painting and sculpture. From then onwards, it moved towards ‘a post-conceptual, transcategorical ontology of materialisations’ – the mix of ‘in between’ or ‘meta’ artistic media such as performance and installation that dominates contemporary practice and with which traditional museums have to contend.2Osborne shows how this current state of contemporary art is the result of both the de-bordering of media (painting and sculpture mainly) and of previously social spaces for art, mainly embodied by national museums. The latter, he claims, have been replaced with a global art market characterised by large-scale international exhibitions and the migrancy of artists, all fuelled by deregulated capital markets that know no national borders. The task of the contemporary art museum today is to reflect and critically engage with this concept of art and these structures of global capital in which it is deeply entangled.
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Gallerist Andrea Rosen and artist Josephine Meckseper

via ArtObserved

The 2012 Guggenheim International Gala took place Thursday, November 8th in celebration of Picasso: Black and White organized by Carmen Giménez. Guests were able to view artworks for the upcoming benefit auction at Sotheby’s on November 13-14th with lots by Gabriel Orozco, Georg Baselitz, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Prince, and James Turrell, among others. Funds raised at the gala and auction are in support of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

In the afternoon I will visit the discussion in the New Museum with documenta 13 director Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev on Contemporary Curating.

Machine Age

September 29, 2012

 

Richard Hamilton, Man, Machine and Motion, 1955/2012, exhibition reconstruction. Installation view, New Museum, New York, 2012. Courtesy the artist and New Museum

by Melissa Gronlund
in Afterall

The phrase ‘ghosts in the machine’ was first used in 1949 by the Oxonian philosopher Gilbert Ryle to reject the dualist thinking of René Descartes: rather than mind and body being separate, Ryle argued, the bodily – what we might call today the hard-wiring of the brain – affects the mind, allowing baser, earlier emotions, such as fear or hatred, to persist despite our logical dismissal of them.1 These biological hangovers are the infamous ghosts in the machine of our brain. Read more …

New Museum
Museum as a Hub