by Line Ellegaard
via Afterall

Etcétera…, Welfare of Exception, 2011, mixed media installation. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. Photograph: Anders Sune Berg. Courtesy the artists and Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Considering the ongoing cuts to the cultural sector across Europe, the situation in Denmark – where the largest exhibition space for contemporary art in Copenhagen, the Kunsthal Charlottenborg, has been left floundering – can hardly be said to be severe. In fact the previous Danish Minister of Culture, Uffe Elbæk, was proud to have been able to secure an additional 20 million kroner (£2.2 million) to the cultural sector for the next four years, and the Kunsthal has recently appointed the well-respected curator Jacob Fabricius as head.1 Still, the short-sightedness of recent ‘prioritisations’ to cultural funding, to use Elbæk’s term, calls for an investigation and rethinking of the criteria that are used to determine the value of both small and large arts organisations by public funding bodies.
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by ROBERTA SMITH
via NYTimes

A copper-engraved frontispiece showing Ferrante Imperato’s Wunderkammer is part of the “Rooms of Wonder” show.

A copper-engraved frontispiece showing Ferrante Imperato’s Wunderkammer is part of the “Rooms of Wonder” show.

Many exhibitions convey the propulsive force of human curiosity, but few manage to do so as engrossingly and with as much immediacy as“Rooms of Wonder: From Wunderkammer to Museum, 1599-1899,” a lavish repast of illustrated rare books and ephemera at the Grolier Club. The appetite for knowledge about foreign lands, unfamiliar animals and all the workings of the world — both natural and man-made — permeates this show, which delves into the origins of the modern museum.
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via artobserved

Jake and Dinos Chapman, The End of Fun (2010), via White Cube Gallery

Jake and Dinos Chapman, The End of Fun (2010), via White Cube Gallery

Since their graduation from the Royal College of Art in 1990, brothers Jake and Dinos Chapman have continually pushed the envelope with their iconoclastic, ambitious sculptures.  Frequently incorporating what they call “bankrupt” imagery, so frequently used by contemporary that it has lost much of its original meaning, the artists create large-scale sculptural works that have frequently drawn fierce reactions from critics and gallery visitors.
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This video documents a part of the performance that Jason and Alicia Hall Moran presented at the opening night of Art Basel Miami Beach’s Art Public program. The performance is titled AiR and contains both jazz and operatic elements. It interacts with Mexican artist José Davila’s public art installation Untitled (The Space Beneath Us), an architectural intervention made of ceramic tiles that was installed in front of the Bass Museum of Art and that translates the Homage to the Square series of paintings by Joseph Albers into sculpture.