Bellows_featured

 

Visited yesterday the George Bellows show at Metropolitan Museum. It is a very interesting exhibition showing mostly the hard life in the first quarter of the 20th century – and it is very American. Partly Bellows seems to be the “father” of Francis Bacon – see the melting flesh of the two boxers above.

by Josefine Wikström
via Afterall

Boris Charmatz, Flip Book, 2008/2012, performance first presented in 2008 at LiFE, Saint Nazaire, France. View of the performance at The Tanks, Tate Modern, London, September 2012. Photograph: Tate Photography. Courtesy the artist and Tate, London

Boris Charmatz, Flip Book, 2008/2012, performance first presented in 2008 at LiFE, Saint Nazaire, France. View of the performance at The Tanks, Tate Modern, London, September 2012. Photograph: Tate Photography. Courtesy the artist and Tate, London

According to Peter Osborne, art before 1945 was based on ‘a craft-based ontology of mediums’,1 mainly dominated by categories such as painting and sculpture. From then onwards, it moved towards ‘a post-conceptual, transcategorical ontology of materialisations’ – the mix of ‘in between’ or ‘meta’ artistic media such as performance and installation that dominates contemporary practice and with which traditional museums have to contend.2Osborne shows how this current state of contemporary art is the result of both the de-bordering of media (painting and sculpture mainly) and of previously social spaces for art, mainly embodied by national museums. The latter, he claims, have been replaced with a global art market characterised by large-scale international exhibitions and the migrancy of artists, all fuelled by deregulated capital markets that know no national borders. The task of the contemporary art museum today is to reflect and critically engage with this concept of art and these structures of global capital in which it is deeply entangled.
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mousse_settembre

via mousse

For roughly three months, a fantastic, trashy pyramid stood —at first, firmly, with the passing days, ever more precariously—in the middle of the big white cube that is the main gallery of the Kunst Werke in Berlin. The monument was composed of cartons of beer. If in the age of UNESCO, exporting monuments is not politically correct anymore (although there are still sporadic pleas in this sense, to save them, in the eyes of the candidate host, and it’s still sophisticated taste to buy old private homes and displace them across continents), Cyprien Gaillard erected a classic monument adopting a commodity which could be mistaken for local but was actually imported from Turkey—with no coincidence, the country that has given the Pergamon Museum its name and its most treasured prize. The structure, made of 72,000 bottles of beer, lived an intense life. Ransacked by visitors, it hopefully comforted some and presumably entertained many.
The intimidating monument, the fulcrum of an art exhibition, morphed into a welcoming and benign stage, and was appropriated as a social playground, with few restraints. “I want to blur the hierarchy between the ruins, somehow all ruins should be equal,” says the artist in an interview—and this book celebrates high and low ruins, equally. (Stefano Cernuschi)

Cyprien Gaillard: The Recovery of Discovery
Susanne Pfeiffer, ed.
Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne 2012
84 pages, € 22

Art Basel Miami Beach

December 8, 2012

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Glass on Body Imprints), 1972.

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Glass on Body Imprints), 1972.

by Jane Simon
via art agenda

Much can be—and, of course, has been—said about the role of Art Basel in the global art market. It’s a fair, after all, that can turn certain “peripheral” cities into cultural centers. What was Basel, what was Miami, before the advent of the art fair? In particular, Art Basel laid down the blueprint for turning a beach town for retirees into a world-class city replete with sophisticated art venues. Surely during a few concentrated days, checkbooks are flung open as widely as the doors to some of the city’s venerable collections. Yet scores of art viewers attend the fairnot to buy art, but to see things they rarely have the chance to experience otherwise, and even to be inspired.
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